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animalwithin
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[*] posted on 11-12-2011 at 02:49 PM
Are lesson's necessary?


Ive been playing guitar for a while now and I'm primarily self taught. I learned from talking to people who know more than me, reading articles, watching videos, research, and practice, practice, practice. For some reason I percieve the Oud to be a more complex instrument with not many sources to help in learning how to play one, although I've heard Oud is easier if you're coming from a guitar background. Do you guys recommend lessons? Are there any self-taught players on here? What did you use to learn?

-Sam
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Brian Prunka
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[*] posted on 11-12-2011 at 03:38 PM


I don't think oud is more complex, but it depends on your personal background. If you come from a country where you grew up hearing maqam music, you may be able to teach yourself oud. You will at least need some guidance on holding the risha, getting used to the tuning pegs, etc.

Most people need guidance on getting the proper intonation, since the oud is fretless.

Personally, I think it's better to get a teacher, no matter what instrument you play. In LA you should be able to find a good teacher relatively easily.




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animalwithin
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[*] posted on 11-12-2011 at 05:23 PM


Got your U2U, thanks Brian! As for finding teachers, I looked and cant find any in LA. The ones that are in LA I emailed and they never replied.
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paulO
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[*] posted on 11-13-2011 at 10:15 AM


You might check with John Bilezikjian: http://dantzrecords.com/contactjohn.html
He at least would answer you -- if you're not interested in this style of playing, he might have somebody you could contact. You could give it a shot.

Regards..Paul
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animalwithin
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[*] posted on 11-13-2011 at 03:55 PM


Thanks Paul. Yea John called me back, gave me lots of info, steered me away from arabic ouds haha, said I should go with Turkish, and his lesson prices arent bad. Hes about 1.5 hrs from me so that will be tough, but I think i will go with him. I'm just saving up for an Oud now. I have my sights set on Dimitris Ouds, but that means I wont be able to play it before I buy it.
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naddad
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[*] posted on 11-13-2011 at 04:17 PM


Lessons are always better than nothing!
Btw, I found OudProff's channel on Youtube helpful in getting ideas on technique and fills
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RVgTtpZXyhA&feature=related

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fernandraynaud
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[*] posted on 11-13-2011 at 05:17 PM


.. And his DVD. There are different cultures playing their music on different types of oud. And then there's just using the instrument as any other string instrument. But personally I found that learning basic maqamat and taqsim is indispensible, whether by yourself, or with a teacher. It opened me to musical concepts that were entirely new, led me to develop technique on the instrument, and get to know the oud's reason for being.
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cjmichael
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[*] posted on 11-13-2011 at 07:17 PM


I have been playing oud for about 4 years casually. I was an autodidact for all that time, learning by listening to recordings and watching clips on youtube. A month ago, I finally found an oud instructor in my state. Though I learned a lot those 4 years, the rate and quality of my practicing, now that I have a teacher, has increased 10-fold. There were so many little problems I had with my tone and scales that would have taken me years to realize on my own. And you can learn so much more from a Middle-Eastern music teacher than just scales, notes, and songs. I recommend you get a teacher. If you can't right now, practice hard on your own and keep looking. The opportunity will come up in the future as long as you're diligent.
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paulO
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[*] posted on 11-14-2011 at 07:11 AM


Hi Sam,

Well, at least John called you back and you got some info. Good luck.

Cheers...Paul
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animalwithin
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[*] posted on 11-14-2011 at 03:33 PM


Yea I will most likely be getting lessons from John starting in the summer, you guys have persuaded me. Now I just have to find an Oud haha. He told me to stay away from Arabic style ouds because they are bigger and sound more muffled. What do you guys think?
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charlie oud
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[*] posted on 11-16-2011 at 11:23 AM


With respect, I think John has given you a personal view, many thousands of players of Arabic ouds for the last 3000 years
have done anything but stay away from Arabic ouds. They are gorgeous instruments, Turkish ones are nice also. Check John is'nt joking or ask him again in case you have misunderstood his advice.




Best Wishes, Charlie
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Brian Prunka
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[*] posted on 11-16-2011 at 11:43 AM


Quote: Originally posted by animalwithin  
Yea I will most likely be getting lessons from John starting in the summer, you guys have persuaded me. Now I just have to find an Oud haha. He told me to stay away from Arabic style ouds because they are bigger and sound more muffled. What do you guys think?


They're not all bigger, and the sound is an aesthetic choice. One could just as easily say stay away from Turkish ouds because they buzz and sound too twangy. If you want a Turkish sound, get Turkish and if you want an Arabic sound, get Arabic.





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abc123xyz
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[*] posted on 11-16-2011 at 06:36 PM


Quote: Originally posted by charlie oud  
many thousands of players of Arabic ouds for the last 3000 years
have done anything but stay away from Arabic ouds.

Not to dispute your point, but I don't think the oud is anything like 3,000 years old.

Does anybody know what the earliest reference to an oud is?

David
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charlie oud
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[*] posted on 11-17-2011 at 02:06 AM


David, Dont take it from me, I'm no scholar. I suggest you start a new thread asking 'How old is the Oud?'
Some say its older than 3000 years!!!:shrug::xtreme::airguitar::bounce::wavey:




Best Wishes, Charlie
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abc123xyz
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[*] posted on 11-17-2011 at 10:07 AM


Quote: Originally posted by charlie oud  
David, Dont take it from me, I'm no scholar. I suggest you start a new thread asking 'How old is the Oud?'
Some say its older than 3000 years!!!:shrug::xtreme::airguitar::bounce::wavey:

Well that's good advice but I don't think I'll do it, because after I posted here I did some googling and most of what I found was online arguments/flame wars about the age of the oud and who (which ethnic group) invented it.

I decided its probably better not to ask after all! D

David
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animalwithin
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[*] posted on 11-17-2011 at 04:33 PM


Yea I definetely want an arabic oud, love the sound over turkish ouds. And I want a 12 string. Will take me a while to save up for one, being a college student. A Dimitris oud will cost me $2000. As for the age of the oud, I think its 3000 as well...although Wikipedia says the oldest pictured lute was found on a 5000 year old metal seal, so I guess its 5000?
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[*] posted on 11-26-2011 at 06:49 AM
learning oud


Quote: Originally posted by animalwithin  
Ive been playing guitar for a while now and I'm primarily self taught. I learned from talking to people who know more than me, reading articles, watching videos, research, and practice, practice, practice. For some reason I percieve the Oud to be a more complex instrument with not many sources to help in learning how to play one, although I've heard Oud is easier if you're coming from a guitar background. Do you guys recommend lessons? Are there any self-taught players on here? What did you use to learn?
true playing the oud became simpler to me after I spent 8 years learning classical guitar with private teachers and in music high schools. In fact i started very late with the oud, and evrything I learnt in guitar helped and conversely, the oud technics helped me improve mu guitar playing: you need first to spot what is common, and that is the theory(writting of music, triolte, sextolets, tremolos, ...) and the hands, relaxed wrists mainly, and the use of the plector( Richa).In the case of the oud, you beat the strings by first lifting your right hand, you must make sure you hit both strings down and up, and as for the guitar, regularity is the "queen" up/down:up down for hours on the AJAM maqam first but you need someone to help, good luck, faria
-Sam
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