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Author: Subject: WHY is hamza al din so damn good?
majnuunNavid
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[*] posted on 10-18-2017 at 09:09 AM
WHY is hamza al din so damn good?


When it comes to my listening pleasure, there's no one on my player's list like hamza al din.

When it comes to absolute listening pleasure, nothing beats Hamza al din for me.

He's not a virtuousic player, he's not flashy. In fact, sometimes his taqasim is sparse and almost too easy... (of course he is also capable of amazing technique too).

I've been trying to understand this better for my own development as a musician.

Is it because he plays with such good feeling? can that feeling really be transmitted so effectively through these recordings?

how does one harness this power?

Anyone else have thoughts like this at one time or another?




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SamirCanada
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[*] posted on 10-18-2017 at 09:11 AM


yes... you need his Nahat.



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charlie oud
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[*] posted on 10-18-2017 at 10:07 AM


I know that sensation, I get it with a few players not just the big names, it's when you are sensing something other than that which we already understand. Hamza would communicate that same thing on any oud, yes the Nahat makes it sound even better but that's not what you're picking up. I believe it has more to do with a state of mind than conventional musicianship. If Hamza was still with us today and you asked him how he creates that effect, he would probably tell you that he doesn't have a clue. It's beyond what we commonly call 'feel'. As musician for the last 45 years I've become sick of that word. I believe it's more to do with touch and a total absence of concentration. Look up the discipline of 'mindfulness' you'll find what I'm trying to explain. I think it's a way of playing music with an approach of letting go, nothing to do with technique or practice, quite the opposite, mindful of sensation, alert and aware in the moment and nothing else. Boy I'm sounding deep, but I believe Hamza along with a good number of others connect only with the sensation and the sound that the sensation produces and away they go. It can be found by anyone but learnt by no one. Lovely stuff.



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SamirCanada
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[*] posted on 10-18-2017 at 10:40 AM


Well put Charlie. I am sure you know I was obviously joking. Just like the best sword is the Excalibur the Hamza Nahat is probably the most perfect oud in existence but you need a pure heart to lift it or play it :) Definitely his feeling when playing was unique and soulful I think you feel it in his playing but more importantly he is not trying to impress with flash. he plays straight from the heart.



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charlie oud
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[*] posted on 10-19-2017 at 03:34 AM


Of course I know you were joking Samir and I don't disagree with you regarding his 'Excalibur' standard oud, an exceptional oud indeed. And I agree with your analysis of his playing.



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[*] posted on 10-23-2017 at 06:54 AM


Quote: Originally posted by majnuunNavid  
When it comes to my listening pleasure, there's no one on my player's list like hamza al din.

When it comes to absolute listening pleasure, nothing beats Hamza al din for me.

He's not a virtuousic player, he's not flashy. In fact, sometimes his taqasim is sparse and almost too easy... (of course he is also capable of amazing technique too).

I've been trying to understand this better for my own development as a musician.

Is it because he plays with such good feeling? can that feeling really be transmitted so effectively through these recordings?

how does one harness this power?

Anyone else have thoughts like this at one time or another?


He is a Nubian. In the region of Southern Egypt and Sudan, they play oud in a certain way. The Sudanese usually only play using the pentatonic scales. Hamza adds extra notes from what he learnt in Cairo. If you listen to other Sudanese oud players, they normally accent the first beat of the notes and play softly in between.
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