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Author: Subject: Difference between Turkish, Syrian, Arabic and Persian Music
mctxp
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[*] posted on 10-21-2018 at 09:12 AM
Difference between Turkish, Syrian, Arabic and Persian Music


What is the difference between Turkish, Syrian, Arabic and Persian Music?
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Jody Stecher
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[*] posted on 10-21-2018 at 04:42 PM



Some of the differences are in language, tone color, musical forms, which instruments are preferred, how the music is learned, how it is thought about by those who sing and play it, in the words used for things and ideas, and in the case of oud, how the instruments are built and why they are built that way, and in the techniques used. Another difference is in the feelings that the music arouses in the listeners, and in the musicians and singers themselves. It takes a better writer than me to be able to put these feeling differences into words.

I remember when in the 1960s musician and musicologist Gen'ichi Tsuge was asked a similar question —in his case it was the difference between Iraqi, Persian, and Turkish music — he answered with no irony and no selfishness : "Well, Turkish music is Turkish, Persian music is Persian, and Iraqi music is Iraqi." Such an answer appears to hide more than it reveals but I don't think he meant it that way. Anyone who has spent time with Turkish, Persian and Iraqi musicians, especially in the 1960s, will probably agree that it's a pretty good answer.

There are so many different kinds of music in the Arab world (including Syria), in Iran, and in Turkey, and some of these do not use oud. There is pop music and village folk music and urban folk music and there are what are called the "classical" traditions. There is vocal music and instrumental music and each have forms, and the vocal music is sung in so many different languages. And some of these things are held in common. And sometimes different things are given the same name. And sometimes the same thing has a different name. And so much of what makes these different musics unique has no name and no words for it at all. It's a matter of "flavor". And there is also much in common. Historically it does seem like the musics might have been more similar.

This forum has a fantastic *search* function. I have learned so much by using it because some of the same topics have come up year after year and sometimes they have been answered in depth by some well-informed generous people.
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[*] posted on 10-21-2018 at 07:17 PM


Thanks for info. I am looking to buy Kanun. There are Turkish Kanun, Syrian Kanun, Persian kanun. I donot know which one to buy.
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Brian Prunka
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[*] posted on 10-22-2018 at 05:49 PM


Turkish kanun is typically slightly smaller and brighter sounding than the Syrian qanun and will have many more mandals (aka urab).
Syrian and Arabic qanuns in general will vary in the number of mandals. Generally, the more the better—it allows greater flexibility of intonation and much more subtlety. On some qanuns, certain maqams are not possible in certain keys because the mandals to create the notes are lacking. Avoid qanuns that are strictly quarter tones.
I don't know anything about Persian qanun.




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SamirCanada
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[*] posted on 10-23-2018 at 10:40 AM


Put this in your pipe and smoke it.

https://youtu.be/mmMzT26FA4A




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[*] posted on 10-23-2018 at 12:59 PM


Thanks you sharing YouTube Video. Excellent Kanun Player.
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Brian Prunka
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[*] posted on 10-23-2018 at 07:35 PM


That sounds beautiful, much darker than most Turkish kanuns I've heard . . . do you know the maker?




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SamirCanada
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[*] posted on 10-24-2018 at 03:25 AM


Yeah the maker is Aks Kanun in turkey. They make wonderful instruments. World class. But it's also technique, Aytac tends to play finger style and more towards the middle of the instrument to get that smooth rounded sound. He is also famous for playing in the gulf for Arabic stars and you can tell he is trying to get that Arabic sound.

You know Pinarbasi the Kanun player in Ara Dinkjian's band? They also made his Kanun.




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Brian Prunka
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[*] posted on 10-24-2018 at 07:27 AM


Oh yeah, Tamar is insane. That whole band is monstrous



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